Dreamsboro: vibrant city has something for all

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Dreamsboro: vibrant city has something for all

Becca King

Becca King

Becca King

The downtown section of a city is often referred to as the “heart” of the city. The heart is what makes the body thrive. It gives the body life and energy and makes it sparkle. It’s not surprising that Greensboro, with its folksy, friendly feel, has a vibrant downtown, rich with history, culture, fun and beauty.

No matter what you like to do, you can find it in downtown Greensboro. Here are our top five Greensboro gems.

The Bargain Box

In every town, what does everyone want to do? Shop. And who doesn’t love to snag cool stuff at rock-bottom prices? The Bargain Box, located at 122 North Elm Street, is the place to shop if that’s your aim. You’ll find up-to-date, gently used clothes for adults and children, household décor, jewelry, menswear and shoes. I’ve shopped there many times and often bought armfuls of great finds for my husband and kids, while still managing to keep my pocket book intact.

The Junior League of Greensboro runs the Bargain Box and helps fund many community-enriching projects.

Greensboro Children’s Museum    

Greensboro Children’s Museum doesn’t feel like a museum at all, but a town all its own that is built for tiny people. Inside, kids can climb onto a part of an airplane, into a fire truck and inside a police car. Hands-on exhibits include a grocery store, bank, doctor’s office and post office. The un-museum also has a movie theater, library and an edible schoolyard.

GCM is designed so kids can be imaginative and creative, and think outside the box.

“We wanted (the museum) to be on (children’s) scale,” said GCM Marketing Director Althea Hall. “We wanted them to experience what they experience in their real world and to be able to come here and touch and feel so it would have the educational component incorporated.”

You can visit GCM at 220 North Church Street on Monday from 9 a.m.–12 p.m. (members only), Tuesday–Thursday and Saturday from 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday from 9 a.m.–8 p.m. and Sunday from 1–5 p.m. Admission is $8 for adults and children 12 months old and older, $7 for seniors 60 and over, $4 on Friday nights from 5–8 p.m., and always free for children under 12 months and members.

Center City Park

Adding to Greensboro’s hometown status is Center City Park, located at 200 North Elm Street. With its beautiful landscapes, lush gardens and aromatic flowers, color Greensboro beautiful. Gorgeous grassy lawns, a pavilion and metal sculptures make this park unique. You can sit and take in the scenery under shade-filled pergolas or on granite benches and enjoy the lighted, layered fountains. Events like concerts, fitness classes, cookouts and weddings take place here throughout the year.

“I actually really like to walk down Elm Street to (Center City Park) and sit and talk,” said senior Justin Williams-Blackwell. “It’s peaceful and refreshing to get away from the chaos of life and party-minded classmates.”

International Civil Rights Center & Museum

Step back in time for a taste of history while visiting the International Civil Rights Center and Museum. A trained tour guide will take you to various rooms and point out artifacts and noted events, such as the lunch counter where the sit-in movement occurred and the first voter registration cards for black people. I took my nieces and nephews and got chills as I viewed a movie about the era and stepped through the different rooms.

The exhibits intend to instill every visitor with an obligation to continue to peacefully seek civil rights for all.

“We want everyone to understand that the quest for civil rights is constant in keeping with building America through core democratic values and the request of the efforts to dismantle patterns of segregation and a racial caste system,” said Executive Director for the International Civil Rights Center and Museum Bamidele Demerson. “And if we are all responsible for weaving the complex tapestry that we call America we can make an America that is an America that is for everyone.

“So we want everyone to leave (the museum) with that feeling that we all have a responsibility for ensuring that we have a country that extends rights to every citizen that lives here.”

Admission for the museum located at 134 South Elm Street is $8 for adults, seniors and students; $6 for children ages 6-12; and free for children five and under with a paying adult.

The Idiot Box Comedy Club

On a lighter note: do your heavy homework loads and finals have you stressed? Tickle your funny bone at the Idiot Box Comedy Club, where stand up, sketch troupes and improv are featured. The Idiot Box also has comedian competitions and improv classes which can run anywhere from $35 to over $100. Local, regional and national comedians are showcased, but anyone with a knack for comedy can try their hand on open mic night, which runs every Tuesday at 8 p.m.

The Idiot Box is located at 438 South Elm Street. Admission ranges from $4–10 depending on the event.

So get out there and see this beautiful city — now you have no excuse not to!

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