Hot or not: choosing the satisfactory career

You are hired! — the magic words every college student wants to hear instantly.

When applying for work, there are a plethora of factors to consider. What pays well? What will I be happy doing? What’s in demand? Get your answers now!

According to TheBestSchools.org, petroleum engineering offers the most money for bachelor degree holders. The median starting salary is listed at $93,000, shooting up to $157,000 by mid-career.

“Petroleum engineers design and develop procedures for extracting oil and gas from deposits located below the earth’s surface and from old wells,” reports TheBestSchools.org.

If nonrenewable resources ruffle your feathers but you still want fantastic pay, just do not go for teaching.

According to The Daily Commercial, “A starting teacher’s annual salary … (will) begin at $37,150 and max out at $56,550.”

“The cons are when students don’t learn,” said Netasha Clark, part-time substitute teacher and CCE senior. “Some of them can be disrespectful, but the pros are being able to see and witness students learn.”

Forbes reports that teachers, along with authors, have high satisfaction ratings. “The autonomy of writing down the contents of your own mind apparently leads to happiness,” Forbes says.

Any guesses as to which career has the lowest satisfaction among employees? It is customer service, a permanent fixture in Forbes’ top ten list of careers with the lowest satisfaction.

“I get to keep up with the latest and greatest computer technology, because we work it every day,” said Sandy Shelton, Contact Center floor coordinator and CCE senior.

“But the biggest con is schedules,” Shelton continued. “The contact center stays open 364 days a year … You’ve got to work at least one weekend day … all the weeks tend to meld together and you don’t have a whole lot of time to use the vacation that you’re given.”

Talk about a demanding job.

Speaking of demand, what careers will almost ensure your employment?

Rain or shine, people will always need to spend money. That is where contractors come in.

“It’s a good basis if you have any interest in going into law or business contracting,” said Cathy Gorton, former Air Force Acquisition Officer. “It’s a great skill set because you have to know how to communicate and write and be willing to go out there and do things with people.”

“Don’t go into the job if you don’t like to talk to people; that’s basically it,” Gorton said.

Interested in interviewing people applying for and answering all the fascinating questions surrounding loans?

Sorry to break it to you, but Yahoo Finance reports, “The demand for loan interviewers and loan clerks has fallen more than 25 percent.”

Instead of working to give loans, you are likely to end up taking a few if you put all your eggs in that basket.

When it comes to careers, some make the big bucks, some keep you smiling and some are in high demand. For guidance on choosing a career, visit the Career Development Center. It is one of the biggest decisions of your life.

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