Stephen King, chapter two: A controversial resurgence

The King of Horror, Stephen King, has been reappearing in the media lately. He has recently released the movie sequel of “The Shining,” and fans are squirming with the heebie-jeebies. Other recent releases of King in the last few years include “Gerald’s Game,” “1922,” “In the Tall Grass” and now “Doctor Sleep.”

Some view King as controversial in his writing, especially in one of his most famous novels/films, “IT.” A particularly explicit child sex scene in the novel draws criticism among his readers, but King has since produced more curiously disturbing pieces. Skepticism has always surrounded King’s work, as many believe he’s insane or truly demented. But others think he’s a genius when it comes to redefining the genre of horror.

“His stuff is so aged, traditionally people want to recreate it years later to get the magic back,” said first-year student Beckett Moore.

King’s resurgence in media has honestly been a long time coming, considering that the “IT” remake has made so much money for the studio that produced it. Other movie-transformed-novellas have been added to Netflix and have been successful as well.

“1922” and “Gerald’s Game” were released relatively closely on Netflix, “1922” having been  released just a month before “IT” chapter  was premiered in theaters. Remakes of certain King films, including both chapter one and chapter two of “IT” and “Pet Sematary,” proved to be box-office successes. King is constantly finding ways to reinvent the genre of horror, whether it be from new adaptations of his novels or remakes of his older movies. King has redefined the market for horror and the craving for more creepy and thriller-type media.

Though King’s work is centered around plots of cultish backgrounds, he also addresses real life situations of homophobia, molestation, racism and sexism. What makes King’s novels and movies so eerie and unsettling are his depictions of these sadly realistic problems, and of course the obvious child-eating clown, or murderous hotel owner and even a sledgehammer wielding mega fan.

Most of King’s work has an underlying issue that fans depict as a true horror story. Call him insane or call him a genius, King has been around for a while, and his work will continue to surprise future generations.

Personally, I believe King to be a translator of modern horror. He tends to write more vulgar and terrifying pieces, but that is what truly hooks readers and viewers everywhere. The more sadistic and barbarous the work may appear to be, the more intriguing it is. King has single-handedly redesigned the horror genre we know and love today. Even back when his most iconic pieces like “IT” and “Pet Sematary” were released, King made a turning point with his creative masterpieces. 

King’s “IT,” “The Shining” and “Pet Sematary” have impacted generations since their initial releases. This is why I hold Stephen King to the highest regard. He’s an author who isn’t afraid to express the deepest, darkest thoughts of those who try to imagine the scariest thing they can, and bring it to life. King was very brave to write what he did in the time period that he made his epic debut.

Controversy has followed King since his publication of “IT.” That is truly the breaking point of why fans and other readers criticize King’s decision to include the vulgarity that he does. King himself regrets a novel he’s written, stating that he believes the novel was a source of inspiration for gun violence in schools. This novel was titled “Rage,” and King demanded that the publication was to be taken off the shelves of any and all bookstores.

Stephen King has faced many years of backlash for his horror-affiliated publications. Cultish accusations and genius praises have both been responses to King’s work. Though highly discussed in the world of horror, King still faces challenges of being criticized. His work will probably always be in that state of constant questioning because of the depth in the material he produces for the world to see. Even if I respect the work of King, others seemingly may label it as brute and nightmarish. But who doesn’t love a great scary story?

The King of Horror, Stephen King, has been reappearing in the media lately. He has recently released the movie sequel of “The Shining,” and fans are squirming with the heebie-jeebies. Other recent releases of King in the last few years include “Gerald’s Game,” “1922,” “In the Tall Grass” and now “Doctor Sleep.”

Some view King as controversial in his writing, especially in one of his most famous novels/films, “IT.” A particularly explicit child sex scene in the novel draws criticism among his readers, but King has since produced more curiously disturbing pieces. Skepticism has always surrounded King’s work, as many believe he’s insane or truly demented. But others think he’s a genius when it comes to redefining the genre of horror.

“His stuff is so aged, traditionally people want to recreate it years later to get the magic back,” said first-year student Beckett Moore.

King’s resurgence in media has honestly been a long time coming, considering that the “IT” remake has made so much money for the studio that produced it. Other movie-transformed-novellas have been added to Netflix and have been successful as well.

“1922” and “Gerald’s Game” were released relatively closely on Netflix, “1922” having been  released just a month before “IT” chapter  was premiered in theaters. Remakes of certain King films, including both chapter one and chapter two of “IT” and “Pet Sematary,” proved to be box-office successes. King is constantly finding ways to reinvent the genre of horror, whether it be from new adaptations of his novels or remakes of his older movies. King has redefined the market for horror and the craving for more creepy and thriller-type media.

Though King’s work is centered around plots of cultish backgrounds, he also addresses real life situations of homophobia, molestation, racism and sexism. What makes King’s novels and movies so eerie and unsettling are his depictions of these sadly realistic problems, and of course the obvious child-eating clown, or murderous hotel owner and even a sledgehammer wielding mega fan.

Most of King’s work has an underlying issue that fans depict as a true horror story. Call him insane or call him a genius, King has been around for a while, and his work will continue to surprise future generations.

Personally, I believe King to be a translator of modern horror. He tends to write more vulgar and terrifying pieces, but that is what truly hooks readers and viewers everywhere. The more sadistic and barbarous the work may appear to be, the more intriguing it is. King has single-handedly redesigned the horror genre we know and love today. Even back when his most iconic pieces like “IT” and “Pet Sematary” were released, King made a turning point with his creative masterpieces. 

King’s “IT,” “The Shining” and “Pet Sematary” have impacted generations since their initial releases. This is why I hold Stephen King to the highest regard. He’s an author who isn’t afraid to express the deepest, darkest thoughts of those who try to imagine the scariest thing they can, and bring it to life. King was very brave to write what he did in the time period that he made his epic debut.

Controversy has followed King since his publication of “IT.” That is truly the breaking point of why fans and other readers criticize King’s decision to include the vulgarity that he does. King himself regrets a novel he’s written, stating that he believes the novel was a source of inspiration for gun violence in schools. This novel was titled “Rage,” and King demanded that the publication was to be taken off the shelves of any and all bookstores.

Stephen King has faced many years of backlash for his horror-affiliated publications. Cultish accusations and genius praises have both been responses to King’s work. Though highly discussed in the world of horror, King still faces challenges of being criticized. His work will probably always be in that state of constant questioning because of the depth in the material he produces for the world to see. Even if I respect the work of King, others seemingly may label it as brute and nightmarish. But who doesn’t love a great scary story?

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