The Guilfordian

Celebrities face prosecution following admissions scandal

Another college admission scandal? What’s next for future generations of celebrity children?

Many parents dream of their children getting accepted into college to pursue a higher education and to have the experiences of college life. Many students worldwide are accepted into college either academically or for a spot on a sports team. There are some students, however, who are accepted into college and must continuously work hard to prove themselves.

The admission process is the same for everyone worldwide, even celebrity children and teenagers in the public eye who want to go to college. Just because they are famous and have access to millions of dollars does not mean that they receive “special” treatment or get to cut straight to the front as many people tend to believe. Once students graduate from college with a degree in a chosen major, there is a sense of accomplishment and knowing their hard work paid off and they have something to show for it.

William Rick Singer, chief executive officer of a “private life coaching and college counseling company” called The Key, is the mastermind behind the whole college admission scandal that surfaced earlier this month. Many wealthy parents, including big names such as Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman, helped contribute over $25 million as stated by Andrew Lelling, U.S. Attorney of Massachusetts, Everyone involved is now being charged and will appear in court due to their actions.

Both Singer and his company either helped students score better on the ACTs or SATs, or bribed different NCAA Division I coaches through connections to get students accepted with fake athletic abilities and credentials. Multiple reports revealed that Singer would bribe the proctors who administered the tests or would hire a third party to take the tests in place of the students. In the various circumstances pertaining to fake athletic abilities, these athletic coaches and officials would give recommendations on who should be accepted into a certain school. There are many different colleges and universities that took part in this scandal that are now having to take drastic matters to get their names out of the headlines.

This includes the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Southern California, Stanford University and Wake Forest University here in the Triad. Reports show that over 50 people were involved in this scandal and of those 50, nine coaches at different schools, two SAT/ACT administrators, an exam proctor, and a college administrator have been charged.

Each student and application involved in this scandal will be reviewed and consideration will be given according to  different factors that are connected and not connected to the scandal.

Many students who were a part of the scandal have been rejected by colleges, but there are different aspects that must be considered in some cases. Reports reveal that some students regretted their actions in relationship to the scandal.

Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman will appear in court along with other defendants April 3.

Huffman has been accused of disguising her money as a charity payment and the FBI first noticed suspicious activity when her daughter got an over 400-point improvement on a standardized test. Loughlin, on the other hand, allegedly gave over $500,000 in bribes for her daughters to be recruited onto USC’s crew team, even though they have never participated in crew. Loughlin has also been dropped by Hallmark Channel following the scandal.

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1 Comment

One Response to “Celebrities face prosecution following admissions scandal”

  1. cottage in nainital on April 4th, 2019 6:59 am

    what would be the fee for post graduation?

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